Land Species - All Creatures which live on land in our world.
Air Species - All Creatures which can fly around the world
Water Species - All Creatures which live in the water all across the world.
Extinct Species - All Creatures which use to live in our world but no longer can be found.
World's Creatures - Your #1 Resource Site for the Worlds Species
NAVIGATION MENU
Home
Animal Facts
Featured Species
Endangered Species
Deadliest Animals
Animal Stories
Chatroom
Tell a Friend
Newsletter
Privacy Statement
Contact Us
Blacktip Reef Shark
Characteristics
Scentific Name:
Carcharhinus Melanopterus
Family Name:
Carcharhiniformes
Size:
160 cm
Weight:
13.6 kg
Color:
Usually light brown upper body, white ventral surface
Life Span:
12 years
Diet:
small fishes and invertebrates.
HOME >> WATER SPECIES >> SHARKS >> Blacktip Reef Shark


Blacktip Reef Shark

Blacktip Reef Shark Snapshot
 
 
 
Blacktip Reef Shark Picture Gallery
 
 
 
Blacktip Reef Shark Description
  Blacktip Reef is the common name for about ten related species of sharks all found in temperate oceans. The body is blue-gray in color - darker in color than most sharks - and they move so beautifully in the water. They are quite small and not considered really dangerous. The Black-Tipped Reef Shark has a well defined black tip to its dorsal fin and its lower tail fin and grow to about 5 feet. They like shallow water around reefs and they will sometimes jump over shallow coral, coming right out of the water, frequently sighted on the Great Barrier Reef. They are often attracted by splashing and will sometimes come up to a snorkler to see what's going on. The Australian Aborigines used to catch them by splashing the water to get them excited and then throwing in a baited hook. By tagging these sharks, researchers have found that they rarely move very far from an area. They usually breed in November-December. They often eat fish but are well known to also eat land-based snakes probably found in the mangroves. They are not regarded as dangerous but have been known to bite the fins and ankles of snorklers on shallow reefs -- more a hazard than a real danger. This shark prefers clear shallow water.  
Sponsor Ad
 



 
 
 
 
Copyright 2004, WorldsCreatures.com, All Rights Reserved