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Melon Headed Whale
Characteristics
Scientific Name:
Peponocephala electra
Family Name:
Delphinidae
Size:
2.7m
Weight:
225 kg
Color:
Coloration is black except on the belly and around the mouth, with the white lips
Diet:
squid and small fish
HOME >> WATER SPECIES >> DOLPHINS >> Melon Headed Whale


Melon Headed Whale

Melon Headed Whale Snapshot
 
 
 
Melon Headed Whale Picture Gallery
 
 
 
Melon Headed Whale Description
  The Melon-Headed Whale is significantly smaller than most species, with an average length of 6-10 feet. As its name implies, this creature has a melon-shaped head that comes to a slight point. Its dorsal fin sits high and curved on its slender body, and its skin color ranges form dark gray, to blue-black, to dark brown. Melon-headed whales often are marked with a dark strip that travels from head to fin and out to the flanks. Some individuals have a dark gray area in the shape of an anchor on the undersides of their white lips, and the mask-like effect is reminiscent of Pilot Whales. This species has 20-25 pairs of teeth on both the upper and lower jaw.

The Melon-Headed Whale should not be confused with the Pygmy Killer Whale, which is an even smaller species, and the False Killer Whale, which is larger. To distinguish between them, just look for the trademark pointed head and a more curved dorsal fin.

This species has strong family ties. An average family unit has between 100-500 individuals, and an extended family can have as many as 2,000. Melon-headed whales are a high-energy breed, and they often socialize with dolphins. Mass strandings of these rapid swimmers are common.

 
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